“Chinglish” – Hilarious Translations

“Chinglish” – Hilarious Translations


Weekly

2016-10-05 Spoonhunt Spoonhunt Spoonhunt

source: Spoonhunt

微信号 spoonhunt

功能介绍 Discover & explore food around you with menus translated into English all over Asia!

 

 


 

As Spoonhunt brings you translated menu items so you don’t have to guess at every Chinese menu you come across, we’re always looking for funny translations in China. Here are some of the funniest bad translations we found this week.

Have some funny Chinglish you want to share? Send us the picture on WeChat! We will pick the best ones each week to post!

User Submitted: CHRIS in GUILIN


Shmke Your Groove Thmng.

Correct translation

舞蹈室 Dance Studio

User Submitted: TOMÁS in SHENZHEN


Nothing can change the Fried Pork, not even the finest gold in all of Thailand. Fried pork is no gold digger.

Correct translation –

泰式金不换炒猪肉、鸡肉/牛肉 Thai Style Sweet Basil Stir-Fried Pork

User Submitted: MIREN in HAIKOU


The prohibited and all activities involving the prohibited are prohibited.

Correct translation –

禁止倚靠 Do not lean against

User Submitted: 余姚农场主 in NINGBO


Never play water. Water will always defeat you one-on-one. Water is the final boss.

Correct translation –

请勿嬉水 Please don’t play in the water

User Submitted: MR SILENCE in CHENGDU


If no yellow bet poison. If yellow bet fire. If green bet poisonous fire.

Correct translation –

禁止黄、赌、毒 Porn, Gambling and Narcotics are prohibited

Have some funny Chinglish you want to share? Send us the picture on WeChat! We will pick the best ones each week to post!

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“Chinglish” – Hilarious Translations was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine

English T-Shirts In Asia (20+ Pics)

English T-Shirts In Asia (20+ Pics)


English T-Shirts In Asia (20+ Pics)

 

One of the great things about the world we live in is the rich and diverse variety of languages that you can find across the globe. The only problem is that, as you can see from these pictures, sometimes these languages don’t quite translate…

In homage to hilarious translation fails, shameless has compiled this list of t-shirts from East Asia that don’t quite say what they should (“Texas state it’s a triangle OMG so hipster triangle”, for example). Some of them don’t say anything at all (well, not unless “temmby woroing terrislylastly” means anything to anyone?). But while all of them may have failed as far as translation is concerned, they have all definitely succeeded in making us laugh. Hard.

Seen any brilliant t-shirt translations that we might have missed? Then add to them to the list below and don’t forget to vote for your favorite!

#1 I’m A Kindergarten Teacher In China And One Of My Students Was Rocking This Shirt Today

#2 I Saw This Girl In Tokyo

#3 At The Golden Pavilion In Kyoto, I Saw This Man With Quite Possibly The Greatest Shirt In Japan

#4 Teaching English In Korea. Best Shirt Ever? Yup!



#5 My Chinese Friend Doesn’t Understand English. This Is Her Favourite Top

#6 This Little Guy

#7 Inspirational T-Shirt In Asia

#8 Gangsta Granny

#9 My Brother Teaches English In Vietnam. I Don’t Think This Young Student Or His Parents understood What His T-Shirt Meant

#10 I Deliver Food To Seniors Who Live In Homes As A Side Job. This Woman’s Shirt Made My Day

#11 Matching Sweaters For Your Favorite And Second Favorite Child

#12 My Buddy Is Teaching Young Kids In Taiwan. This Is His Student

#13 Haters Gonna Hate And Ain’ters Gonna Ain’t

#14 Got A New Shirt, It Means ‘Tranquility’ In English

#15 Japan And Its Impossible Standards

#16 Oops

#17 Funny English-Language Slogans On T-Shirts Is Nothing New In Asia, But This One Really Stood Out To Me

0

#18 Much Sense. Wow

#19 You Don’t Want To Mess With This Lady


 

 

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English T-Shirts In Asia (20+ Pics) was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine

The IoT Files: The need for cryptography

The IoT Files: The need for cryptography

The IoT Files: The need for cryptography

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One of the main arguments that should be touched by IoT discussion is cryptography. There is an undisputed consensus that cryptography is a mandatory requirement to preserve security and privacy in the IoT world, but we are far away for a general consensus on how to operate.

The need for cryptography in IoT comes from two main aspects:

The first need is clear; encryption is a mandatory requirement when we want to implement any form of authentication and non repudiation. Encryption is widely used even if we don’t know we are using it. PKI, sign in certificates are just some example.

Whenever we want to transmit something, encryption comes in hand to be sure what we transmit is not seen by 3rd party and not tampered.

Whenever we store something encryption comes handy when we need to preserve the access to those data, even at a local level.

Regarding Data privacy, it is a way more strong call for encryption, a wide use of it. As a system IoT allow a multitude of devices to exchange data that can become sensitive and private. Without a clear understanding of this point there can be misinterpretation. In IoT the amount of data and metadata will be way bigger than the already impressive amount of data we deliver on the wild nowadays. So basically a more cautious approach to data privacy will be needed and embedded into the very essence of IoT, therefore encryption will be a mandatory requirement.

But encryption is not an easy area, and I am not talking about implementation (which can e easily achieved) but for the need and use of this technology.

A little check on the actual status

Cryptography is not only a technical or business argument (cost vs performance vs security) but, mainly, a political issue.

The history of cryptography has been doomed by constant attempts to block, or control, the use of good secure cryptography tools in the civil environment. It is not a mystery nowadays we have a lot of discussion upon cryptography and backdoors (although the term “backdoors” is misleading and misused most of the time).

The USA has, as an example, a good and long history fighting against civil cryptographic tools both in the past, may be someone remember the PGP affair, and in nowadays events, think of apple case as a clear example.

Every time we lower the level of security for some reason, we have to expect sooner or later someone else will leverage and use it for purpose not intended by the regulator. Recent history is full of those examples; some of the actions performed against cryptographic tools are on the news every day. We tend to call them vulnerability (SSLTLS vulnerability like freak  …) but let us be clear on what they actually are: the consequences of export grade restriction on cryptography.

There are a lot of laws and regulation related to the use, import and export of cryptography, here some examples:

This section gives a very brief description of the cryptographic policies in twelve countries. We emphasize that the laws and regulations are continuously changing, and the information given here is not necessarily complete or accurate. For example, export regulations in several countries are likely to change in the near future in accordance with the new U.S. policy. Moreover, some countries might have different policies for tangible and intangible products; intangible products are products that can be downloaded from the Internet. Please consult with export agencies or legal firms with multi-national experience in order to comply with all applicable regulations.

Australia

The Australian government has been criticized for its lack of coordination in establishing a policy concerning export, import, and domestic use of cryptographic products. Recent clarifications state that there are no restrictions on import and domestic use, but that export is controlled by the Department of Defense in accordance with the Wassenaar Arrangement.

Brazil

While there are no restrictions of any kind today, there are proposals for a new law requiring users to register their products. Brazil is not part of the Wassenaar Arrangement.

Canada

There are no restrictions on import and domestic use of encryption products in Canada today . The Canadian export policy is in accordance with the policies of countries such as United States, United Kingdom, and Australia in the sense that Canada’s Communications Security Establishment (CSE) cooperates with the corresponding authorities in the mentioned countries.

China

China is one of the countries with the strongest restrictions on cryptography; a license is required for export, import, or domestic use of any cryptography product. There are several restrictions on export regulations, and China is not participating in the Wassenaar Arrangement.

The European Union

The European Union strongly supports the legal use of cryptography and is at the forefront of counteracting restrictions on cryptography as well as key escrow and recovery schemes. While this policy is heavily encouraged by Germany, there are a variety of more restrictive policies among the other member states.

France

France used to have strong restrictions on import and domestic use of encryption products, but the most substantial restrictions were abolished in early 1999. Export regulations are pursuant to the Wassenaar Arrangement and controlled by Service Central de la Sécurité des Systèmes d’Information (SCSSI).

Germany

There are no restrictions on the import or use of any encryption software or hardware. Furthermore, the restrictions on export regulations were removed in June 1999.

Italy

While unhindered use of cryptography is supported by the Italian authorities, there have been proposals for cryptography controls. There are no import restrictions, but export is controlled in accordance with the Wassenaar Arrangement by the Ministry of Foreign Trade.

United Kingdom

The policy of United Kingdom is similar to that of Italy, but with even more outspoken proposals for new domestic cryptography controls. Export is controlled by the Department of Trade and Industry.

Israel

Domestic use, export, and import of cryptographic products are tightly controlled in Israel. There have been proposals for slight relaxations of the regulations, but only for cryptographic products used for authentication purposes.

Japan

There are no restrictions on the import or use of encryption products. Export is controlled in accordance with the Wassenaar Arrangement by the Security Export Control Division of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry.

Russia

The Russian policy is similar to the policies of China and Israel with licenses required for import and domestic use of encryption products. Unlike those countries, however, Russia is a participant of the Wassenaar Arrangement. Export of cryptographic products from Russia generally requires a license.

South Africa

There are no restrictions on the domestic use of cryptography, but import of cryptographic products requires a valid permit from the Armaments Control Division. Export is controlled by the Department of Defense Armaments Development and Protection. South Africa does not participate in the Wassenaar Arrangement.

 

In the table below, 75 countries have been divided into five categories according to their cryptographic policies as of 1999. Category 1 includes countries with a policy allowing for unrestricted use of cryptography, while category 5 consists of countries where cryptography is tightly controlled. The table and most other facts in this answer are collected from [EPIC99], which includes extensive lists of references. Countries with their names in italics are participants in the Wassenaar Arrangement .

 

1 Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Dominica, Estonia, Germany, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Mexico, Morocco, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Tanzania, Tonga, Uganda, United Arab Emirates.
2 Argentina, Armenia, AustraliaAustriaBelgium, Brazil, BulgariaCzech RepublicDenmarkFinlandFranceGreece,HungaryItalyJapan, Kenya, South KoreaLuxembourgNetherlandsNew ZeelandNorwayPolandPortugalRomania, South Africa, Sweden, Taiwan, TurkeyUkraine, Uruguay.
3 Hong Kong, Malaysia, SlovakiaSpainUnited KingdomUnited States.
4 India, Israel, Saudi Arabia.
5 Belarus, China, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Pakistan, Russia, Singapore, Tunisia, Venezuela, Vietnam.

NOTE: WHAT IS THE WASSENAAR ARRANGEMENT?

The Wassenaar Arrangement (WA) was founded in 1996 by a group of 33 countries including United States, Russia, Japan, Australia, and the members of the European Union. Its purpose is to control exports of conventional weapons and sensitive dual-use technology, which includes cryptographic products; “dual-use” means that a product can be used for both commercial and military purposes. The Wassenaar Arrangement controls do not apply to so-called intangible products, which include downloads from the Internet.

WA is the successor of the former Coordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls (COCOM), which placed export restrictions to communist countries. It should be emphasized that WA is not a treaty or a law; the WA Control lists are merely guidelines and recommendations, and each participating state may adjust its export policy through new regulations. Indeed, there are substantial differences between the export regulation policies of the participating countries.

As of the latest revision in December 1999, WA controls encryption and key management products where the security is based on one or several of the following:

A symmetric algorithm with a key size exceeding 56 bits.

Factorization of an integer of size exceeding 512 bits.

Computation of discrete logarithms in a multiplicative group of a field of size is excess of 512 bits.

Computation of discrete logarithms in a group that is not part of a field, where the size of the group exceeds 112 bits.

Other products, including products based on single-DES, are decontrolled. For more information on the Wassenaar Arrangement, see http://www.wassenaar.org/.

Why IoT needs cryptography and where?

IoT, as a general concept, refers to a multitude of object that can access to the Internet.

The need to access the internet is related to several aspects: need to exchange data, receive command, and export outputs…

Of course there are different needs and different grade of privacy and security required accordingly to the nature of the object we are talking about: it is not the same thing to talk about an infotainment car system, an autonomous driving system or a GPS, as well is different when we talk about a refrigerator or a SCADA controller in a nuclear plant.

But, no matter what the device is and its role, some assumptions are common to all IoT objects:

  • They have to deal with sensors
  • They have to deal with data
  • They have security and privacy implications
  • They have to store data
  • They have to transmit data
  • They have to received data

The first point is important in the encryption discussion because sensors can retrieve information that can give indication to an expert eye to a lot of things outside the realm of the IoT object.

Data are of course the main reason to implement encryption.

Security and privacy implication are the obvious case study for encryption.

The last three points are where encryption should, at least, be implemented.

One of the common mistakes related to IoT security consideration is to focus on a specific aspectdevice and not see the big picture.

Looking at a specific device is good for implementation, but not good to understand security and data privacy issues. What can seems trivial in an object assume a different role in a context, and IoT is all about context.

So the idea is that even if some data can seem harmful, they can assume a different value if merged with other data.

Cryptography role, in this context, is to prevent those data to be used for not authorized and not wanted activities. But cryptography is also one of the basic tools needed to allow data integrity and non repudiation.

Cryptography, of course, is not the panacea of very problem, but it is one of the tools to be used when we transmit and store data in order to preserve and save information.

Data transmission

When we have to transmit or receive data, no matter if commands, processed outputs or raw data, we should be confident that our data:

  • Comes from a trusted and authorized source
  • The data has not been manipulated during the transport (Data injections, data forgering…)
  • Data are protected by unauthorized access (data sniffing…)
  • The data are consistent with the requests

Encryption can play its role mainly in the second point, although encryption is also used for authentication and authorization aspects.

Encrypting a transmission allow the data to pass from a point A to a point B without third party can read it preventing exfiltration of data. And since the key provide a basic level of authentication a data encryption can provide also some defense against injections of unwanted data.

The downside of encryption is related to two aspects: solidity of the encryption and key exchange.

Those aspects are not trivial, a 40 symmetrical encryption key can be easily forced by modern computer systems (see as an example the “Bar mitzvah attack” on ssltls protocols), therefore a 40 bit encryption (see freak lesson) is a clear security hole.

On the other end even a longer encryption key is useless if the key is discovered.

Processor time and resources

The longer the key the more the encryption will take in terms of time and resources. Encryption chipset are, usually, the answer to solve this aspect, while they can do a little on key exchange.

The argumentation against a wide use of long keys in encryption (256 bit) are, in reality, more related to political or costs constrain than to technical ones. And even costs are just partially a problem, scaling the production would make those chips inexpensive.

Of course software encryption is a more economic (but, may be, less secure) way to address the question on IoT.

All the point is to understand how much we can invest in this IoT device in terms of resources.

Another point to take care of is the overload that encryption gives on network package. Usually a encryption protocol brings some overload to the transmission due to bigger packets (although the use of compression can reduce it) and the key exchange process which can require several exchanges.

The key exchange issue

The other issue is the key exchange. To make encryption (symmetrical or asymmetrical) you need to exchange the key with your partner in communication.

The key can be

  • Static
  • Dynamic

A static key is easy to be implemented and can be hardened in the solution. The problem with static keys is that they can be good for storage issues but not good for data transmission. Once the key has been discovered all the security has gone

Dynamic keys are a more secure solution, a lot of protocols rely on dynamic keys for data exchange, take as an example, SSLTLS yet implementation needs to be careful in order to avoid the same level of problem discovered on the aforementioned protocols.

One problem is related on how to create your key, a weak protocol can create some predictable keys that can be easily guessed, and this is one of the typical requests of export grade encryption.

Also rely on PKI infrastructure is not, per se, a secure solution. PKI keys can be stolen andor forged.

Data storage

Data should be preserved when we are transmitting but also when we store them

It seems trivial but data storage is not as simple as it seems in IoT. We can have different kinds of data: permanent, semi permanent and volatile.

Let us assume that volatile data are those used at the moment and then destroyed, we should focus on the permanent or semi permanent ones.

Again this is a generalization, and specific implementation can differs, but generally speaking permanent data stored needs, as first instance, a storage area.

This area can be local or remote (the cloud), accordingly to the data needs.

Apparently the more secure solution would be storing data locally in the device. This is a simplistic approach since the security of the data stored in a devices are strictly related on how secure is the access to the device, which is not clear.

If the device is not able to set up a proper authentication and authorization mechanism to internal resources (this is way a more extensive need than locking the door from outside visitors) data stored locally need to be protected from external intrusion.

Encryption is, of course, one of the technology sounds to be implemented. As for data transfer here we can name the same arguments for key length we discussed before. Another important aspect here is the ability, of the system, to wipe out physical data moved from the storage area in order to prevent sophisticated data exfiltration techniques.

Again the problem here is how to deal with the Key to encrypt and decrypt data. This is the scenario we saw on the Apple vs St. Bernardino’s FBI case to refer to current episodes.

What IoT need

For a security standpoint it is no doubt that a strong encryption approach should be necessary for IoT, there are no real justification, from a technical and economical point of views, against this implementation.

The problem comes from the political approach related to encryption. Encryption lives in a dual identity status as a civil technology and a military one. Recent geo political issues (cyber terrorism and terrorism) have fueled the discussion against encryption potentially harms future implementation with “backdoors” style design (insecurity by design).

Without a common agreement on encryption we can face 2 different scenarios:

One scenario sees a short key length implementation, with practically no security advance beside marketing statements.

Another scenario sees an IoT divided into regions where encryption is or not allowed, making for you not possible to go in specific countries because of the technology implemented in your cardiac stimulator (I assume you can leave your phone and watch at home using an allowed device).

Of course both are not what IoT is claimed to be.

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The IoT Files: The need for cryptography was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine

Our memories are all we have

Our memories are all we have

SPETT.UMBERTO ECO A NAPOLI (SUD FOTO SERGIO SIANO)
SPETT.UMBERTO ECO A NAPOLI
(SUD FOTO SERGIO SIANO)

I am in China for work, with a few connection to the real world outside, so Italian news usually comes to me late, when I am able to connect to internet from hotel; great firewall allowing.

Being isolated from the Italian reality put things into a different perspective, allow you to keep less news with more time to digest and think about.

It happened a few days ago I learned of the death of Umberto Eco, one of the greatest Italian tinker of our age. He was a great writer, a great thinker, a truly free spirit.

The first thing I did when I knew about his death was to feel a great sorrow, in a moment my country needs desperately to turn back to its origin loving culture and what culture means, losing such a man was a great loss.

I used to write to my daughter every day, and force her to do the same. No matter what just the silliest thing, but I want her to learn to be committed and to use an old way of communication such writing (although with email).

After the new, instead of writing the usual nonsense we love to share one to another, I asked my daughter, 12, to read the letter Eco wrote to his nephew just to make her understand the importance of living, learning, knowing and remembering.

http://espresso.repubblica.it/visioni/2014/01/03/news/umberto-eco-caro-nipote-studia-a-memoria-1.147715

I am trying, not sure with how much success, to rise her with a critical eye on reality, trying to give her the tools to understand where things come from and just not see the moment but live it, knowing and understanding why things are what they are.

The letter was all I am trying to teach my daughter, but with way better words and meanings. But I am not Umberto, and have not a blink of his incredible knowledge.

But I remember when I was younger I did not understand the need to learn things and memorize them, I got the reason growing old, when I understood that my experience (therefore my memories) are the metric to analyze the world. And probably now I say I should have memorized more.

The Eco sad news move something on me so  I was started reading back some interviews with Eco and it make me think, what is the meaning of our lives? memories.

At the end it is memories that shape our life, and growing old we will add memories that will be the reason we lived for.

How we shape those memories is our job, we can build them good or bad, silly or deep. But it is all up to us. but to make memories we have to live them, somehow.

Reading, travelling, doing things. and those memories are the building blocks of what we are and will be. To make memories we need to understand what we see and what we do.

I have the vision of my daughter when she was ready born, a wonderful ugly conhead. So small and so a great responsibility with the lightest wight.

I remember when we discovered my wife was pregnant, I were in the kitchen when she told me the result of the test, i was shaking.

And I remember the teenage friends and our nightly talk about politics or music.

I remember the good and bad part of the job, and the people I worked with.

I remember my mistakes (this is why I write on management so much)

I remember what I would have liked to know at work (This is why I write on technology so much)

I remember that I fall in love with Japan looking at anime and manga, and then going deeper into that country history and culture, alas not language, shame on me, so I have had to enjoy Banana Yoshimoto only in italian, I am sure loosing so much (with all the respect for the translator).

I remember my first trip in USA, where all was not, at the end, so big but not all food was Mc Donald.

I remember how was wide opening to discover back my latin heritage (thanks Rika), and starting to understand the good (and bad) of the spanish speaking world.

I remember how was incredibly rewarding to read and understand Joice, Tolkien, Agatha Christie, Conan Doyle in the original language, see what only the original language can gives you. I can see Holmes home, as well as Miss Marple smile looking out of her windows. Are part of my life.

I remember how was amazing to open my life to the spanish language, writers, music and culture (I could not have understood and appreciate Orozco or Frida Kalo without knowing that culture, see, watch, talk, smell, listen, breath that culture).

I usually say to my daughter that if you know more you will find more things to enjoy. Reading is a wondeful way to find new wonderful things. Studying history and, also, its implications gives you the ability to look at the world with different eyes, so understanding different cultures, languages, foods and so on.

I disagree with the ones that claim that ignorance is a best way to happiness, ignorance is the easiest way, easy path is never (or seldom) the best path. And I disagree with the ones that for fear close themself in a shell wasting their life in useless fears, and ultimately I disagree that to preserve its own identity you have to close to the different, stranger and new.

So different from the world we are shaping for our sons. A world of people with no memory of the past is doomed to live the same errors again and again, isn’t it? Isn’t what we see everyday? Do we still care (or humanity have ever cared about) historical memory?

C’è poi la memoria storica, quella che non riguarda i fatti della tua vita o le cose che hai letto, ma quello che è accaduto prima che tu nascessi.

Then there is the historical memory, one that isn’t about the facts of your life or things you’ve read, but what happened before you were born.

Life is a learning path, and memories are the foundations of this learning. without memory of the past we can not build good memory for the future, unless we like to live in a lie (but so many did it, isn’t it?).

There is more truth in a novel than in any political speech, there is more truth in a joke than in any serious comment. Probably this is the reason why novelists, writers and comedians have, usually, the sharpen vision of our world; they have to work with memory for a living.

The moment we stop making memories, for us and for the others, we just stop living.

 

La memoria è un muscolo come quelli delle gambe, se non lo eserciti si avvizzisce e tu diventi (dal punto di vista mentale) diversamente abile e cioè (parliamoci chiaro) un idiota. E inoltre, siccome per tutti c’è il rischio che quando si diventa vecchi ci venga l’Alzheimer, uno dei modi di evitare questo spiacevole incidente è di esercitare sempre la memoria.

The memory is a muscle like those of the legs, if not used fades and you become disabled (mentally) and therefore (let’s face it) an idiot. And also, since for all there is a risk that when we get old we get Alzheimer, one of the ways to avoid this unfortunate incident is to exercise more and memory.

How many times I have seen people that stopped to use their “brain” muscle, close to learn and understand (hope you can appreciate the difference between know and understand, although the first is a mandatory step to the second).

I hope to have more human beings like Umberto Eco, that was so proud and joyful  to play with memories, and I hope my daughter will learn something from that letter.

May be when she will be my age….

She will try to write the same post, just better.

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Our memories are all we have was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine

Bunch of anniversaries, lol, thanks for reminding LinkedIn

Bunch of anniversaries, lol, thanks for reminding LinkedIn

Ok I have crossed another year last year I have  crossed my 50 (in august) and now I am trying to make a living i the 2016.

th (1)LinkedIn helped me to remind me there have been some work anniversary for me this month, and so I receive a lot of congratulations, which I really appreciated.

I usually do not stop to think about those anniversary, but receiving all those message make me think on what I am doing. So basically I receive anniversary wishes for my blogs, my activity as a trainer, journalistwriter and for my current Job.

let’s talk a bit about my blog: The Puchi Herald (yes this one) and the related publications(actually several): a long journey started collecting info i think were interesting, and ended with this blog.

I have to admit a blog is a good way to send away some stress, I do not expect people reading it, when I write I write mostly from myself, to help my ideas get clear. Happy to know there is people around the world enjoying it. I should write more, but time tyranny does not me allow to be more consistent.

I will try to be more active though, I have plenty of ideas and so a few time to write. Luckily I am in china now and I can Use my weekends to write, since I have nothing else to do. But I will talk about it more later.

Time and work are the most shameful constrains, and so I haven’t been able to write more even as a journalist, so I have not been present in daftbogger and hakin9 or eforensic magazine. I will try to get back on track this year.

Now last but not last one year in my Chinese job.

I have to say it is a hard long difficult journey, language and cultural barrier are sometimes a big obstacle. Living in Shenzhen 50% of my time always in hotels make me regret I don’t know any Chinese, sometimes even a taxi can be a difficult activity (mostly if they don’t want to pick you up as occurred me this week).

People here is very good, and food is great, alas the knowledge of English is even worse than in Italy. Most of Chinese people who study English do not practice it (apparently at school they do only written tests) the result is that the spoken language does not exist and as a result communication is hard. Sometimes you can overcome it with Wechat (Wēixìn) translator, sometimes with smiles and gesture. But people try to help you if they can and they are always smiling. Sure they insist you should drink more hot water…. (still not get used to it)

Hot water, is the common drinking. If I have to see a difference I would say is in the way they drink..tea, hot water, hard to find cold drink. even beer is commonly served at room temperature (they consider it cold). sometimes they do not drink during meals, since usually have a soup of some kind. the overall quality of food is good, and street food, if you dare, is great. Top restaurant can be expensive, but not at western levels, but sometimes the queue is unbearable, I have seen people waiting 2 hours to be seated…no way.

Orientation can be a problem, all signs are in 2 languages, English and Chinese. The problem is that the English you read is not the Chinese translation, so sometimes is hard to explain where is the place you need to go or need to meet. But the metro is great, cheap and easy to sue. On the other end taxi are a challenge. you have red and green, green can go everywhere, red have restrictions. They can be stopped on the street (if you are lucky to find one) but don’t expect they talk any English. And sometimes the meter does not start … not only with western guys but also to Chinese people, so prepare to have unpredictable fare… There is Uber that can be used, alas I don’t know why I haven’t been able, it does not accept my Italian paypal and it seems not possible from here to connect my credit card.

And if you think to use a map … you should remember that google services does not work here, so better you have a Microsoft or Apple phone or download an offline map, unless you want to try a Chinese one (be my guest with the user interface, lol).

Hotels are a big question mark here, they look good, but it is hard to find an English-speaking support or even  English material telling what to do for, as an example, connecting to wifi or have standard services as room service. If there is a refrigerator (Chinese people does not like cold stuff, even beer should be requested cold) it is empty and disconnected, and if you are lucky you find 2 tv channels not in Chinese (one from Hong Kong, amusing the censorship when it strike). Of course this is not the situation in 5 star hotels for western and Chinese rich guests, hotels that are not passed by my company (3 stars in western standard are considered luxury).

Overall is easier to live than to work in china. The biggest differences are related to management style that is quite far from western standards, the Chinese attitude in business to not see the obstacle,  the complete dependency by procedure and rules that overrule even reality (not so different from some big western company you could say). Generally speaking is very hard for a Chinese to accept another point of view, mostly if coming from a western guy, they jump immediately on the defensive putting rules and policies in front of you. Even in front of evidence that the rule is not working there is a tangible reaction, all is forwarded to the “company” or the “managers”. Sometimes is frustrating, but I am starting to get used to, they have their way to overcome the problems, even if sometimes not at the requested speed (workaround are not always effective or timely, but workaround is all you can have here). As a general statement, it is not accepted any critic, and suggestions have to be carefully presented in a way that does not seems to contradict what they are doing. And anyway they will deny any difficulty. This is the reason they tend to have all Chinese managers and the biggest number of employees native Chinese or with Chinese heritage. The few westerns they keep on board are due to a critical lack of expertise or external constrains, and they have a hard life form a management and communication point of view. Some are happy, by the way, because this way they can live in a relative close and stable environment as long as they do not show themselves. let say that understatement, agree and not contradict is the best way to survive, easier in technical role, hard when it comes to business, communication, marketing or external related stuffs. Alas embracing the Chinese way is not in my strings so makes my surviving more difficult.

 

OK I wrote enough, may be too much.

see you to the next.

a

 

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Bunch of anniversaries, lol, thanks for reminding LinkedIn was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine

Global Cooperation in Cyberspace Initiative


th (3)Dear Colleagues,

 

The EastWest Institute is leading a Global Cooperation in Cyberspace Initiative to help make cyberspace more secure and predictable. As part of that initiative, EWI has established a “breakthrough group” that is working to enhance cybersecurity for governments and enterprises globally by enabling the availability and use of more secure information and communication technology (ICT) products and services.

 

For providers in the ICT supply chain, the group is promoting the use of recognized and proven international standards and best practices that improve product and service integrity. For buyers of ICT, the group is working to foster the use of procurement practices that are founded on recognized and proven standards and best practices for secure ICT.

 

This request for input asks you to evaluate a set of principles, relevant and appropriate standards and best practices, and a set of questions for buyers and providers that will provide practical guideposts for evaluating and enhancing the security of ICT products and services.

 

Please complete the following request for input by December 7th.

 

The link for the request for input is: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/LLN975D

 

Sincerely,

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Global Cooperation in Cyberspace Initiative was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine

Pavia – Shenzhen 4:I think what I need here is a surviving guide


I think what I need here is a surviving guide :)

I have had the chance to talk with some western colleagues, apparently we share, more or less, the same difficulties.

Language Barriers

Let be clear, if you want to take shenzhen metro, well it is a piece of cake, all indications are in chinese and english, the train are modern as the stations. Every stop is clearly described on the train (and announced in both languages) so it is a great way to travel here.

The things get differents when you need a cab.

you have to wait on the street hoping to find a free taxi running, then you try to call it somehow (being italian make me easy to work with gestures, lol). and beware of the color, not all taxi can go everywhere, so if you are a little far form the centre may be you find red and green ones. not all can drive you where you want or need.

And once you are in… welcome language barrier. trying to explain where you need to go is not easy, so better you write or print the direction, i have my hotel business card always with me, just to be sure I can show him the direction.

I have not found any cab driver able to talk in english as of now.

Alas if you plan to use your google translator here, you could have problems, golden firewall blocks google tools.

surviving tips:

1) download an offline maps for your phone, will be useful.

2) if you plan to stay here a bit, and you want to connect using a 4g\3g network i suggest you to buy a sim in Hong Kong, there are plans without roaming from china, with 6 and more gb\month and it is outside the golden firewall, that means you can easily have all your tools working.

3) download a vpn software before being here if you plan to use a local sim or some roaming (but is so expensive, would you really like to go on roaming?)

4) if you buy a phone here, be aware that chinese android version is different, it does not run some google key engine so some apps could not work, eventually you can install a new rom (in some shops they do it for foreign people)

I am still struggling to find a decent translator. The hardest point is being able to translate written text of course. I have this issue also at work, chinese love to send communication with graphics instead plain text. Visually nice sure, but hard to deal if you are not a chinese speaker.

Food is great

I love chinese food, but you should be aware of some things:

They do not use to drink at lunch or dinner, beside some tea. And the water is usually warm, a sort of very light lemonade i think. if you want cold water or even cold beer you should ask for it. Do not give for granted that they bring cold beer if you ask one.

And do not give for granted the have cold drinks at all.

As in hotel even if they have a fridge it is probably empty and disconnected.

(now mine has some bottles of water and a beer, lol)

Food is generally cheap here and of good quality, if you plan to eat western style you have to spend a little more, but usually you can eat under 200 yuan.

Well I cannot guarantee for the quality of western food, i tried Pizza Hut and I was quite disappointed. But I have seen also a lot of KFC here and some Starbucks. I have had coffee at starbucks and was good, but not sure it was because of quality or because I were missing coffee so much :)

You should also be aware that chinese way at restaurants is different:

restaurants are usually loud, people talk normally.

Chinese food is shared, they bring you several different things, and all people take with the chopsticks. they usually leave bones and stuffs on table, spitting directly on the table. You have to be used to this, can be a little strange at the beginning.

 

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Pavia – Shenzhen 4:I think what I need here is a surviving guide was originally published on The Puchi Herald Magazine